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Minority Languages, Resources

Learn Frisian in 400 Words

What if I told you 400 words is all it takes to survive in a language?

To express yourself in a foreign language is never easy, but by learning the most basic verbs, descriptive adjectives and nouns you can cover most daily interactions and have a head start when trying to learn this language.

At The Foreign Language Collective we have created a list of the 400 most basic words and have asked people in our community to translate them to their native language.

Together we have created multiple guides to help you communicate yourself in any language.

The main focus of this guide is communication. Grammatical perfection is something that takes time, but communicating is the basis of any language.

The idea is that these words can serve as your basic skill set from where you can build understandable and descriptive sentences to allow you to communicate yourself.

The guide is built from basic verbs and sentences, as well as nouns and adjectives that can help you describe things or people.

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor why use many words when a few will do

That is why we have included lots of words like “big” or “small”, “dark” and “light”, but also words like “more” and “less”.

From here you can describe things as “More big”, which may not be grammatically correct but it will in most cases be understood.

You can also combine words like “Yesterday” and “Tomorrow” with your basic verbs, so you can say things like “I go tomorrow”, which in some languages is grammatically correct, in others it is not, but it will always be understood.

We are aware you can not become fluent with 400 words, but the idea is to give you a good base for you can communicate and understand the most basic things. From there on you can get the conversation going, ask questions and learn more.

Learning many words or grammatical often doesn’t make sense until you actually need it, so when the time is right you can move on and research the things you think are missing in your communication.

Whether you just want to cover the basis or continue learning this language until fluency, these 400 words are a great start for you.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD OUR SURVIVAL GUIDE IN FRISIAN

Want to know more about our Language Survival Guide and the languages we offer them in? Make sure to check out our page and follow us on Facebook to make sure you don’t miss any updates.

400 Word Guide, Minority Languages, Resources

Learn Catalan in 400 Words

What if I told you 400 words is all it takes to survive in a language?

To express yourself in a foreign language is never easy, but by learning the most basic verbs, descriptive adjectives and nouns you can cover most daily interactions and have a head start when trying to learn this language.

At The Foreign Language Collective we have created a list of the 400 most basic words and have asked people in our community to translate them to their native language.

Together we have created multiple guides to help you communicate yourself in any language.

The main focus of this guide is communication. Grammatical perfection is something that takes time, but communicating is the basis of any language.

The idea is that these words can serve as your basic skill set from where you can build understandable and descriptive sentences to allow you to communicate yourself.

The guide is built from basic verbs and sentences, as well as nouns and adjectives that can help you describe things or people.

That is why we have included lots of words like “big” or “small”, “dark” and “light”, but also words like “more” and “less”.

From here you can describe things as “More big”, which may not be grammatically correct but it will in most cases be understood.

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor why use many words when a few will do

You can also combine words like “Yesterday” and “Tomorrow” with your basic verbs, so you can say things like “I go tomorrow”, which in some languages is grammatically correct, in others it is not, but it will always be understood.

We are aware you can not become fluent with 400 words, but the idea is to give you a good base for you can communicate and understand the most basic things. From there on you can get the conversation going, ask questions and learn more.

Learning many words or grammatical often doesn’t make sense until you actually need it, so when the time is right you can move on and research the things you think are missing in your communication.

Whether you just want to cover the basics or continue learning this language until fluency, these 400 words are a great start for you.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE SURVIVAL GUIDE IN CATALAN

Want to know more about our Language Survival Guide and the languages we offer them in? Make sure to check out our page and follow us on Facebook to make sure you don’t miss any updates.

 

Minority Languages, Resources

Learn Kurdish in 400 Words

What if I told you 400 words is all it takes to survive in a language?

To express yourself in a foreign language is never easy, but by learning the most basic verbs, descriptive adjectives and nouns you can cover most daily interactions and have a head start when trying to learn this language.

At The Foreign Language Collective we have created a list of the 400 most basic words and have asked people in our community to translate them to their native language.

Together we have created multiple guides to help you communicate yourself in any language.

The main focus of this guide is communication. Grammatical perfection is something that takes time, but communicating is the basis of any language.

The idea is that these words can serve as your basic skill set from where you can build understandable and descriptive sentences to allow you to communicate yourself.

The guide is built from basic verbs and sentences, as well as nouns and adjectives that can help you describe things or people.

That is why we have included lots of words like “big” or “small”, “dark” and “light”, but also words like “more” and “less”.

From here you can describe things as “More big”, which may not be grammatically correct but it will in most cases be understood.

You can also combine words like “Yesterday” and “Tomorrow” with your basic verbs, so you can say things like “I go tomorrow”, which in some languages is grammatically correct, in others it is not, but it will always be understood.

Whether you just want to cover the basis or continue learning this language until fluency, these 400 words are a great start for you.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE SURVIVAL GUIDE IN KURDISH

Want to know more about our Language Survival Guide and the languages we offer them in? Make sure to check out our page and follow us on Facebook to make sure you don’t miss any updates.

 

 

Minority Languages, Resources

Learn Romanian in 400 Words

What if I told you 400 words is all it takes to survive in a language?

To express yourself in a foreign language is never easy, but by learning the most basic verbs, descriptive adjectives and nouns you can cover most daily interactions and have a head start when trying to learn this language.

At The Foreign Language Collective we have created a list of the 400 most basic words and have asked people in our community to translate them to their native language.

Together we have created multiple guides to help you communicate yourself in any language.

The main focus of this guide is communication. Grammatical perfection is something that takes time, but communicating is the basis of any language.

The idea is that these words can serve as your basic skill set from where you can build understandable and descriptive sentences to allow you to communicate yourself.

The guide is built from basic verbs and sentences, as well as nouns and adjectives that can help you describe things or people.

That is why we have included lots of words like “big” or “small”, “dark” and “light”, but also words like “more” and “less”.

From here you can describe things as “More big”, which may not be grammatically correct but it will in most cases be understood.

You can also combine words like “Yesterday” and “Tomorrow” with your basic verbs, so you can say things like “I go tomorrow”, which in some languages is grammatically correct, in others it is not, but it will always be understood.

Whether you just want to cover the basis or continue learning this language until fluency, these 400 words are a great start for you.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD THE SURVIVAL GUIDE IN ROMANIAN

Want to know more about our Language Survival Guide and the languages we offer them in? Make sure to check out our page and follow us on Facebook to make sure you don’t miss any updates.

Minority Languages, Resources

Learn Hawaiian In 400 Words

What if I told you 400 words is all it takes to survive in a language?

To express yourself in a foreign language is never easy, but by learning the most basic verbs, descriptive adjectives and nouns you can cover most daily interactions and have a head start when trying to learn this language.

At The Foreign Language Collective we have created a list of the 400 most basic words and have asked people in our community to translate them to their native language. Together we have created multiple guides to help you communicate yourself in any language.

The main focus of this guide is communication. Grammatical perfection is something that takes time, but communicating is the very basis of any language. The idea is that these words can serve as your basic skill set from where you can build understandable and descriptive sentences to allow you to communicate yourself.

The guide is built from basic verbs and sentences, as well as nouns and adjectives that can help you describe things or people. That is why we have included lots of words like “big” or “small”, “dark” and “light”, but also words like “more” and “less”. From here you can describe things as “More big”, which may not be grammatically correct but it will in most cases be understood.

You can also combine words like “Yesterday” and “Tomorrow” with your basic verbs, so you can say things like “I go tomorrow”, which in some languages is grammatically correct, in others it is not, but it will always be understood.

Whether you just want to cover the basis or continue learning this language until fluency, these 400 words are a great start for you.

CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD OUR SURVIVAL GUIDE IN HAWAIIAN

Want to know more about our Language Survival Guide and the languages we offer them in? Make sure to check out our page and follow us on Facebook to make sure you don’t miss any updates.

 

Minority Languages

The Slovak Sound Foreigners Can’t Pronounce

Learning a new language is always difficult. You have to learn a completely new form of expressing yourself.

My personal experience learning this new language was quite funny. I learned Slovak language during an exchange year; so most of my learning consisted in listening to conversations and repeating the words I understood and remembered. But as in every language there was a catch.

Slovak language like a lot of Slavic languages has letters or sounds that for Latin speakers could be very very difficult to pronounce and vice versa.

One example of this is the letter “Ť” that sounds like a combination between t and q so the sound which can be a real challenge for a non Slavic speaker, and a Latin speaker is probably going to pronounce it the wrong way, usually is a combination with t and ch. For Slavic speakers it’s quite funny how Latin speaker pronounce this letter or sound.

In the opposite case Slavic speakers tend to have a problem pronouncing a lot of vowels smoothly because their languages consist on a lot of consonants together, so when they speak Spanish for example they tend to pronounce the consonants really hard and for Spanish speaker sounds also funny.

Like this there are a lot of sounds in Slavic languages that are quite hard to pronounce, but what is actually really hard to learn are all the terminations for each word. What I mean is that in Spanish the variation of the words depends only in quantity and gender. For example a group of girls is niñas while a single girl is niña and a group of boys niño and a single boy is niño. As you can see it doesn’t change a lot, but in Slovak language they have seven different terminations, which I still don’t quite know when to use or not, and it’s also really funny for them because sometimes I keep using the wrong termination. An example maybe can be your own name. I will make a table of how to say something in Spanish and Slovak

Phrase Spanish Slovak
I’m going with Regina Voy con Regina Ídem s Reginou
Regina’s brother El hermano de Regina Reginin brat
Regina’s sister La hermana de Regina Reginina sestra
Regina’s phone El móvil de Regina Reginini Mobil
We are going for Regina Vamos por Regina Ideme po Reginu

 

This is just a tiny bit of what Slovak language is, it is quite difficult to learn, especially if you have never even heard it before, but it’s also a very interesting language. 

I can’t say I know how to speak it fluently because I don’t, I would say I can decently communicate; but trying to learn this language has been one of the biggest challenges in my life, but I love challenges and learning.

If you are looking for learning a challenging language I would totally recommend you any Slavic option being these Czech, Polish, Slovak, Serbian, etc. because also afterwards you will be able to understand a bit of each it so it will be pretty cool.

If you are currently learning a very different language from yours don’t sweat it, it is normal to mispronounce things and it may take some practice to get it right, but also people will really love that you speak in their language. They will totally love it, as Nelson Mandela said

 

“If you talk to a man in a language he understands, that’ll go to his head. If you talk to a man in his language, that’ll go to his heart.”

 

Written by Regina Vidrio A.

 

Minority Languages

Did You Know the English Language Has A Secret Brother?

You may want to sit down for this because you are about to find out your Germanic mother gave birth to another language. That’s right. In the north of the Netherlands there is a province called Friesland, and the language they speak bears an uncanny resemblance to English.

Map of UK + Ireland, the Netherlands and Friesland

If you are confused right now, you are probably not the only one. Not many people outside of the Netherlands know of this language, and in fact even within the Netherlands people often think Frisian is merely a dialect. For those of you who still think that, let me help you right here with this Germanic language family tree.

 

As you can see both English and Frisian are actually part of the Anglo-Frisian branch, whereas Dutch stems from Old Low Franconian. Generally people already consider Swedish, Danish, German and Dutch to be somewhat similar to English, but ‘genetically´ Frisian is the closest language to English. The influence of French on English and Dutch on Frisian might make these similarities harder to see, but we all know you can’t forget your roots.

When we compare certain words and word categories in English, Frisian, Dutch and German we can see how close the two languages really are, especially when we take a look at the pronunciation.

For example the word “cheese”. In Dutch it translates to “kaas” and in German to “Kãse”, which is all similar enough. The Frisian version however is “tsiis’, which on paper just looks like something typed by your cat when he walks across your keyboard, but when you consider the pronunciation of the double I is almost identical to the English double E, whereas both Dutch and German chosen a completely different vowel for this word.

Not only that, but in many other words where English has the “Ch” pronunciation, the Frisians have kept very similar phonetics (only they attach different letters to them).

Another set of examples of words where the Frisians have stuck to the English phonetics is in words like “sleep”  or “sheep”. The Frisian “IE” is identical to the “II” sound, which as mentioned before is like the English “EE”,  while for some reason both Dutch and German have both gone with an “A” sound in these words.

 

But the similarities don’t stop there. When you look at the English words like “Way” and “Day”, where the “Y” has been switched for a “G” in Dutch and German, in Frisian they have kept the “I” sound, and though it is written with an “e”, the “EI” sound in Frisian is comparable to the “YE” or “IE” in “dye” or “die”.

 

And last but not least, an “N” before a ‘voiceless fricative’ (meaning an “S”, “F’ or “TH”) can be found in Dutch and German, but is largely lost in English and Frisian.

Interestingly, though Frisian is still widely spoken in Frisian households the education is generally in Dutch. This means that when people in Friesland learn English it will most likely be taught in English, which means many Frisians don’t make the connections between English and their native language (and I say this from experience).

So now you know that Friesland is not only the province with the coolest flag (see Exhibit A) with it’s famous pompeblêdden (not hearts), but also that one province that speaks a language that is ridiculously close to English.

If you are interested in learning minority languages such as Frisian, try your luck with the Memrise App.

 

Bonus, the Frisian word for “this” is “dizze”, only proving my original hypothesis that Frisians are the real OG’s

Exhibit A